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Tokyo Trash Baby
16-12-2003, 11:56 AM
Does anyone else look back on these days with fond memories? For me this was the time when I moved from weekend button basher to fulltime gamer. There was nothing like getting a new game, only to skip school the next day so I could stay home and play. These were days when buying a game was much more rewarding than it is today. Maybe it was because when you’re at school money has a lot more worth, where as games today can be bought without a second thought. This was a time when gaming wasn’t mainstream nor “cool”, these are the days I want back.

Now I understand as gamers we are spoiled today. 3 consoles, 2 online and libraries that extend into the thousands. But maybe it’s this saturation that’s killing the concept of hardcore gamer. As the mainstreamers purchase on cover art or an official magazine recommended it, gone goes those hard to find titles or retro games from the shelves of your local gameshop, only to make room for a thousand copies of Gran Turismo 3.

Don’t get me wrong I’m still gaming everyday, I’ve just given up trying to find that gaming enlightenment I experienced 5 years ago, a void that’s not fulfilled in this current-gen era.

The 32bit era, the final time hardcore gamers could claim the video gaming industry as their own.

IcePak
16-12-2003, 12:10 PM
I know exactly how you feel. I too feel that the market has become too oversaturated, and this has caused a blurring effect, since so many games are very similar in design. And well too much of a good thing can actually be a bad thing.

The business-like structure that the games industry has taken on in recent years also helps contribute to that, because publishers just want to make money. Thus most people who are interested in developing games are pressured into churning out games that publishers want them to release (ie games that sell like licences and sequels).

A part of it has to be nostalgia though. A lot of gamers look back to their teenage gaming years with nothing but the fondest of memories. There's nothing wrong with that, but believing that nostalgia has no part in your fondness for that time period is decieving yourself.

IcePak
16-12-2003, 12:22 PM
I also believe that the 32-bit era started the games industry on the track it is now, especially in regards to the Sony and the release of the Playstation. For example, look at the Saturn with it's not-quite-as-large selection of game.

Imagine what it would have been like if Sony hadn't decided to get into the console business. The games industry would be quite different from what it is today. Without the commercialisation that Sony bought in, gaming might still be considered a niche hobby for "computer nerds". Whether this is a good or bad thing is completely up to you. On the one hand, the acceptance of videogames by the mainstream makes your enthusiasm toward videogames not as bad in the eye of most people, however the market has been oversaturated with too many titles trying to cater for everyone's tastes as a result of this.

The 32-bit war would only have consisted of the 3DO, Saturn, Jaguar, and Nintendo 64 (and yes, I know the latter two are 64-bit, but they were part of the same generation). All of these companies would have had a much better chance of surviving, and who knows who the console king would be in in this day an age in this alternate reality. The 3DO never really had the games to keep the system afloat, and Sega probably would have ended up making too many add-on systems and run themselves into the red that way (and I'm a huge Sega fan). The Jaguar might have been able to become a profitable system for Atari, and they might still be around today (I'm dismissing the fact that Infogrames now use Atari's name for their company). And Nintendo may have been successful enough to win the console wars for a third generation. Although all of this is pure speculation on my part of course.


I hope I haven't rambled on too much. :)

Valken
16-12-2003, 01:50 PM
I play my Saturn more than any other current gen machine to this day but...

<pedantic mode>The current generation machines are still 32bit</pedantic mode>

bangaio
16-12-2003, 03:18 PM
Also, remember that th e"32bit era" machines were around before we had NTSC-UK, or real mainstream web use so when the PSX was announced as it was and when the golden saturn prototype machines were glimpsed in Edge or similar it was truly exciting, an amzing time to be a gamer. Now everyone knows the latest news, the latest games are disected before they arrive on you door mat from japan, you read about new consoles and games in the sunday newspapers who also cover E3, the tokyo toy show. Some of the lustre has gone. This brings plusses, cheaper imported games, better buying knowledge, better help, less waseted purchases but some of the fun seems to have gone, not the exclusivity but the fun and excitment.

Abhisara
16-12-2003, 04:47 PM
Does anyone else look back on these days with fond memories?
Oddly enough, it's exactly the opposite for me. This was the time when I lost all interest in gaming. Back then, none of the new consoles or games appealed to me...


I also believe that the 32-bit era started the games industry on the track it is now, especially in regards to the Sony and the release of the Playstation.
...and I think this was part of the reason. I didn't like the hype and the way the industry was beginning to head towards the mainstream, and eventually just went off gaming (although there were other contributory factors).

Since getting back into gaming, I've pretty much caught up on everything I missed on the PlayStation now and am just about to start on the Saturn (should be getting one with a few games in the next couple of days 8)).


A part of it has to be nostalgia though. A lot of gamers look back to their teenage gaming years with nothing but the fondest of memories. There's nothing wrong with that, but believing that nostalgia has no part in your fondness for that time period is decieving yourself.
Very true. Although it was before my teenage years, my fondest memories come from the late 8-bit/early 16-bit era. I still remember being fascinated with the PC Engine and Megadrive import reviews and wondering whether I would ever get a chance to play these games (and now I have, half of them aren't quite as good as I'd imagined them to be which has tarnished a few childhood memories).

War Crimes Tribunal
16-12-2003, 05:58 PM
32-bit gaming put me off games for a few years. It was while at university I started to get pangs for Gunstar Heroes...My brother sent me a CD with some emus and games on...a year later I had bought a Saturn and set about getting all those excellent games that I thought didn't exist anymore...

Most friends of mine never went back to gaming after the MD/Snes days.

The early gen stuff for the PS and Saturn put them off for good.

Max M
16-12-2003, 07:30 PM
This was a time when gaming wasn?t mainstream nor ?cool?, these are the days I want back.

Are you crazy? The PS1 was probably the most mainstream and popular console to date! It was games like Tomb Raider, Wipeout and Resident Evil that started the whole "gaming is the new cool" crap in the first place.

Sketcz
16-12-2003, 08:36 PM
I, personally hated the 32-bit era.

It killed gaming in me for a few years. Sure we got our SOTN and saturn shooters, but it felt.... wrong somehow.

The transition into 3d was a painful one for me.

Check my sig, favourite gaming era:
83-95

83 when the Vextrex was released, through the 8-bit :wub: and then 16-bit :wub: era's
Culminating with the SNES in a final blaze of glory. (also, the sega cd, turbo duo, negeo cart and cd's systems, as well as the jag and 3do systems)

For me, gaming was a gamers pass time BEFORE 32-bit
32-bit brought the playstation, and the sickening "coolness" of the after pub session, by people with "hip lifestyles."
<shudder>

Ill be blunt, I preffered it when it was insulated, and nerdy, and had bad press, a small community of obsessives isolated from everything, when you either played it because you were a collector geek, or a kid.

Also, 32-bit pretty much killed off sprite's, which I still mourn the passing of. Dodonpachi and metal slug can only satisfy my TV sprite longing for so long.

To summarise, I did not like the 32-bit, and subsequent era's for various reasons. The DC slowly rekindled my love for gaming, then it died.

I just dont get the buzz I used to get, say from living in 1993.

I am a jaded, cynical gamer, with rose tinted specs, who is mired in past glories, slowly going down with the ship. Sadly, I look to the past, so blinkered as to be unable to see what brilliance I already have within my grasp.


;)

Sketcz
16-12-2003, 08:38 PM
This was a time when gaming wasn’t mainstream nor “cool”, these are the days I want back.

Are you crazy? The PS1 was probably the most mainstream and popular console to date! It was games like Tomb Raider, Wipeout and Resident Evil that started the whole "gaming is the new cool" crap in the first place.

As usual, Max M comes to the rescue with an intelligent post free of ramble. :happy:
I second that.

Vaipon
16-12-2003, 08:44 PM
PC gamers are still playing 32-bit games. LOL. ;)

Valken
16-12-2003, 08:52 PM
Argh!

Pij
16-12-2003, 08:54 PM
The 32bit Era was a bit hit and miss for me.

Shmups got better, we had arcade games like Ridge Racer,Virtua Fighter, Virtua Cop, Time Crisis, some classy Capcom fighters (zero 1-3, Vampire series, VS series)

But on the other hand we had piles of pap, 3D games with the worst clipping and camera angles around, and a huge decline in 2D games. And imo a huge decline in originality.

Firsty
16-12-2003, 09:17 PM
16 bit please

electric_warrior
16-12-2003, 09:47 PM
I hated 32 bit. Going from probably the best 2d graphics could get to horrible 3d efforts 'twas horrible.

IcePak
17-12-2003, 10:57 AM
Ill be blunt, I preffered it when it was insulated, and nerdy, and had bad press, a small community of obsessives isolated from everything, when you either played it because you were a collector geek, or a kid.

I feel exactly the same way. Sure, a wide range of acceptance is a good thing, but looking at what it's done to the industry, I'd prefer not to have it.

JU!
17-12-2003, 11:33 AM
I think it's sad when amazing games like GGX2 can slip into a 2 for ?30 at HMV and still no one buys it, do people not realise how good this game is? :dry: The same can be said for VF4Evo these don't get barley any coverage in mags like official PS2 etc.

dataDave
18-12-2003, 02:14 PM
I was quite excited about the transition to 32-bit until I played Daytona on the Saturn. I lost quite a lot of interest after that.

The only games I thoroughly enjoyed from the 32-bit era were the Biohazards, the RPGs and the 2D fighters. It's funny how I can say the same for the 128-bit era as well. :dry:

Apart from graphics getting better the industry hasn't changed one bit since '96. Name me something as revolutionary as Super Mario 64.

Tom Salter
18-12-2003, 02:22 PM
The 32-bit era gave me Doom on a home console, for which I am eternally grateful :)

Tomb Raider was fantastic for its' time. I really, really wish the follow-ups to the original were half as good as it, none of the sequels compare to the first game :\

Resident Evil was mind-blowingly good in it's day. Even with Resident Evil 3 the series was still great.

The N64 was the system which hosted possibly the best games of the era though. I played Wave Race 64 to death even inventing my own tricks (which sadly don't work in Blue Storm) and Mario 64 is one of my favourite games of all time. And Ocarina of Time is like, my favourite game of all time :D

bcass
18-12-2003, 02:44 PM
A lot of people seem to associate 32-bit gaming with the advent of 3D gaming. In which case, the Archimedes home computer beat them all to it many years previous (released in 1987). The Archimedes being the first commercial (true) 32-bit system (using RISC architecture) which was powerfull enough to render 3D worlds (much more fluidly than the ST/Amiga, which were admittedly only 16-bit).

Metal Head
27-12-2003, 07:33 PM
The 32 bit era was around for a little bit before going mainstream.

I bought a 3DO a little after UK launch....?399. I had come through the 8 bit computer days, through the Amiga, and at the time I bought my 3DO (32 bit cd console) I had an Amiga 1200 and a Snes.

I enjoyed my 3DO....The whole CD thing was a novelty, but the FMV and polygons were intriguing.

Then, on UK launch day I bought a Playstation for ?299. This wasn't a mainstream console like the MD and Snes, this was an expensive elitist gamers console and for me the killer app was Ridge racer. Other games I enjoyed were Rapid Reload and Jumping Flash(the first real 3D platformer).

Then I bought a Saturn and I loved that...Panzer Dragoon, Daytona, Rally, VF2, Virtua Cop loved 'em...and then it all went wrong....I put the blame on such stuff as That bloody Bandicoot, Lara croft et al.

The PS price went down and down, EA started churning out their yearly updates and Gaming became mainstream and trendy and as I knew it died.

Gaming is currently in much the same position as pop music...all profit oriented manufactured crap. For PS2 read Will Young, for X Box read Busted.

God bless Mame.

Kubrick
27-12-2003, 09:23 PM
The 32bit era was not that bad IMO. The PlayStation and Saturn might have had dozens of bad 3D games, but there were still loads of great games that appealed to veteran gamers as well, and not all of them were 2D.

The biggest problem the 32bit machines created IMO, was their ability to produce "movie-like" graphics and speech. This resulted in a lot more crap games with storylines and FMV sequences instead of gameplay and interaction being made. Western developers were particularly guilty, and still are obsessed with making most games some kind of "cinematic event" instead of concentrating on the gameplay first and foremost.

MartyG
27-12-2003, 10:17 PM
Xbox, PS2 and GC are all 32 bit - seems some things haven't changed that much.

Regards
Marty

M?bius_One
27-12-2003, 11:33 PM
I really miss the generation of cartridge games. There's something about having a solid cartridge like Zelda: OoT with the hologram cover that makes it more special.

MartyG
28-12-2003, 09:39 AM
I miss the cartridge games too - though this is more down to the loading times. Some of the games we play now take ages to boot. Nintendo still seem to be pretty good, but the rest are dire.

I don't believe the advent of the Playstation or Saturn turned the games industry towards where we are now, so much as the media on which games were released, i.e., CD. There was so much space on the discs, many games got filled with lots of CG, simply because they could. It's still happening now.

Regards
Marty

Shimmyhill
28-12-2003, 04:30 PM
PS2 cpu isnt 32bit, its 64/128

Anyhoo to the issue at hand, like others on here 32bit was a disapointment to me, the 3d was crude and at shocking framerates. i find it hard to play 32bit 3d games these days as the offend my eyes (not in a eye candy way)

16bit is where it was at for me, but then i was at school for 16bit and at work for 32bit. I think that it is a factor in that you buy many more games when you have the cash and therefore each game isnt treasured as much.

Also 32bit tried to kill 2d as it was no longer fashionable - for this reason alone ill always hate 32bit ;)

Streets Of Rage
28-12-2003, 11:33 PM
32 bit was great, most 3d stuff was deon badly, but some of the 3d stuff still isnt too bad today, was playing ridge racer the other day and altho it looks dated its still very enjoyable, i originally bought a PS1 then swapped over to a Saturn, which was marvellous and had some fantastic games

Fastware
28-12-2003, 11:55 PM
Blame the Mega CD and 3DO for all the movie story games. That's where developers first tried to make games and films combine. Thank the lord that the FMV game died with those machines too.

MartyG
29-12-2003, 08:27 AM
PS2 cpu isnt 32bit, its 64/128

It's a common misconception - adding up dual processor speeds and claiming it's a true XX-bit system is where the term "Atari Math" originated from.

That lovely emotion engine at it's core is a MIPS III architecture, which at a push might get by as 64 bit (depends on the visibilty of the size of the external registers) - but it's certainly not 128 bit.

Regards
Marty