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Thread: Game of Thrones

  1. #1

    Game of Thrones

    Premiers April 17th in the US (18th April on sky).
    Ten one hour episodes in the first season. HBO will be showing the first 15 minutes as a preview April 4th. No idea if Sky will do the same.



    Based on the A Song of Fire and Ice novels. At least the first season is supposed to follow the book very closely.




    Lots of cast/preview video are available on the main site - http://www.makinggameofthrones.com/


    Looking forward to it but I'm not expecting something truly amazing.
    Whilst letting the actors use their natural voices will let them focus on acting the disparate accents are very noticeable.
    No consistency in the visual effect. Some janky budget effects on show. They could be using different styles to highlight the different regions, shrug.
    Last edited by Bort; 14-03-2011 at 10:38 AM.

  2. #2

  3. #3
    looks pretty cool. Like Sean Bean - his Boromir grew on me I must admit, to the point I thought he did a great job.

    Can't remember what happens in the books it's been so long since I read the first couple (see book reading thread!). Might have to dig these badboys out of storage.

  4. #4
    Is it going to be one series per book? (edit - I assume not, or they wouldn't have used the name of one volume as the name of the show). I'm half way through the 2nd now and it's super addictive stuff. What I like about it compared to other fantasy novels, is the rapid pace. When he sets up something dramatic to happen, it happens within 3 or 4 chapters. In other series I'd be waiting a book and a half to get the pay off.

    Some of the stuff is going to be mighty weird on TV though, I assume they will be changing quite a lot to make it palatable for TV audiences.
    Last edited by Darwock; 14-03-2011 at 11:40 AM.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Darwock View Post
    Is it going to be one series per book? I'm half way through the 2nd now and it's super addictive stuff. What I like about it compared to other fantasy novels, is the rapid pace. When he sets up something dramatic to happen, it happens within 3 or 4 chapters. In other series I'd be waiting a book and a half to get the pay off.

    Some of the stuff is going to be mighty weird on TV though, I assume they will be changing quite a lot to make it palatable for TV audiences.
    It's being made by HBO; home of Oz, the Wire and Deadwood so they would only have to diverge to fit the new format.

    I don't think they've said if they plan to do one book per season or multi/extended seasons for the later books.

  6. #6
    Close to finishing the first book, should probably hold off watching this until I've read the whole series but I'll probably break down and give it a go on day one!

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Bort View Post
    I don't think they've said if they plan to do one book per season or multi/extended seasons for the later books.
    According to this old Variety article that was the plan but who knows if that's still the case. I read rumours somewhere recently (and can't remember where) that HBO may have already put the second season in pre-production so filming could start earlier. The article I read presumed this was because the scale would be much larger because it's based on 'A Clash of Kings'.

    Given it'll be nearly 6 years between the release of book 4 and book 5 I can't see that they can keep to 1 book per season. Who knows when The Winds of Winter and A Dream of Spring will ever appear to finish this off. Maybe all that HBO money will inspire Martin to get off his arse and finish the series though.

  8. #8
    As long as he finishes it before he dies!

  9. #9
    He gets upset when people say that.

    So you just know it's nailed on to happen.

  10. #10
    Hollywoord Reoporter:


    Quote
    It?s difficult to single out the most accomplished parts of Thrones. The ambition is immense, the fantasy world exceptionally well-conceived, the writing and acting elevating the entire series beyond contemporaries like The Borgias and Camelot, and the visual appeal continues to surprise with each episode.

    What we have here is the successful pairing of an acclaimed collection of fantasy books with a television series that illuminates and expands what?s on the page.

    Worth the wait? Absolutely. And even if you have no idea what all the fuss is about, you should get in from the start and absorb Martin?s fantastical tale.
    When I sat down to watch the first six episodes of HBO's Game of Thrones, which doesn't debut until April 17th, I knew that I would be viewing them from a particular perspective.

    As someone who has read the first four books in George R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series - the fifth comes out in July - on multiple occasions, I knew my way around this story. I would not count myself among those who have an encyclopedic knowledge of Westeros, and I'll readily admit that the density of the books means I often misplace particular story events within my memory, but the fact remains that I am very familiar with the world Martin created and the characters he chose to have inhabit it.

    Accordingly, I expected my view of the series to be influenced by this perspective: I would know more about these characters than the show would expect me to know, able to fill in details and see foreshadowing that most viewers would not even know was foreshadowing. I would be more excited about seeing things come to life than I would be about seeing things happen, surprised not so much by the events transpiring but by the decisions made in giving those events physical form. However, I also presumed that I would ultimately remain the stoic critic figure, my familiarity with the series presenting less as a "fandom" and more as an extra layer that would contribute to my experience.

    So imagine my surprise when my experience became defined by this familiarity, my fairly casual "fandom" transformed into a giddy reverie by the time the credits rolled on the show's pilot. This is not precisely Martin's books come to life, but I would argue that this is a love letter to A Song of Ice and Fire and those who hold it most dear. It does not just stumble its way into bits of foreshadowing: it fully embraces the scale of this narrative from the word go and begins to craft a tale worthy of the source material. It does so not just through strong performances and evocative production design, but also through tapping into the very qualities that made the source material so compelling on a structural level: this is not just an instance of plot and character being spun into a new medium, but rather David Benioff and D.B. Weiss drawing inspiration from a man who knew how to build something.

    The result is a rare adaptation which compounds, rather than challenges, our appreciation for the franchise in question. Game of Thrones may not yet be the finest show on television, but it is well on its way to being one of the most rewarding television experiences I've ever had, and certainly shows the potential to be found in continuing to explore Martin's - and now Benioff and Weiss' - Westeros for many seasons to come.
    Naughty Dog co-founder Andy Gavin:
    http://all-things-andy-gavin.com/

    Quote
    This is a very faithful adaption of fantastic source material, but the series also plays to television?s strengths. The production is lavish, landscapes, sets, costumes, food, everything looked tremendous. And sounded tremendous. I saw a 35 mm print on the big screen with a serious sound system. After the titles alone (gorgeous) and the pitch perfect music I had goosebumps.

    The casting/acting is also fantastic, and combined with the great writing is going to make this ambitious show work.

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