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  1. #21
    I'd like to think Hellblade proved more about stabilising the future of the industry than Loot Boxes did. Publishers need to reduce the emphasis on AAAA projects and milking the teats of those titles as hard as they can. More lower budget, lower risk stuff than could potentially springboard new ip whilst at the same time reduce the amount of times companies take 5yrs+ to get a single product out the door.

  2. #22
    I think there are developers and publishers out there that shun scummy business practices. However the big western publishers just don't care and are ultimately exploring every possible scheme to make more money. And they just love the 'uncapped donations' through Lootboxes.

  3. #23
    Getting hard to keep up, but there are a number of governments and authorities proposing new rules or looking in more detail at Lootboxes. the Swedish Government is the latest: https://www.gamesindustry.biz/articl...ox-controversy

    I know on ResetEra there's been a number of these sorts of stories posted. Far too early to draw any conclusion but interesting to watch things develop.
    Last edited by Digfox; 08-02-2018 at 03:43 PM.

  4. #24
    Just bumped into this fantastic thread over at 'Era. GI.biz posted a story on the Hawaii proposed legislation in the US. The news item drew a few comments and someone has worked out that some of these are from a former EA employee who has gone full on defensive mode in the comments.

    As you can imagine it's drawn quite a few responses; https://www.resetera.com/threads/muc...t-boxes.23759/

  5. #25
    It'll be interesting to see how the industry adapts if this stuff crosses over into mobile game territory as well.

    I have little sympathy for console devs who are exploiting loot boxes to rip off their customers, because when I buy a game for 40 I expect it to be a game; not the base functionality and content necessary to get me to buy more stuff.

    Mobile games have always been problematic though. Part of the reason the whole freemium thing with all the currencies sprung up is that mobile devs really tried selling low-cost premium games on the platform (Squaresoft, in particular, made a huge effort it, porting things like the PSP FF Tactics and various DS games like Final Fantasy IV, even having big new IPs for mobile like Chaos Rings) but the mobile consumers just would not buy them, no matter how cheap they were*. Consider how people were posting furiously on Twitter about how the developers of Monument Valley could be so greedy as to charge 1$ for the expansion. It was bizarre. People on mobile seem to think that 5$ is some kind of king's ransom.

    (*in b4 someone says "but X-Com..." - it was one game, was 4 years ago, and was a fluke)

    Consequently developers had to develop more and more ways to charge for games in little dribs and drabs, and the freemium model became the standard.

    This change was consumer led. And people bitch about it; people do compain about the models, but they then don't go and buy the alternatives that exist (or at least, in some cases, they just didn't back when they did exist).

    If loot boxes and other freemium mechanics are outlawed, we might see a proliferation of more premium titles on iOS, which I would honestly welcome.

  6. #26
    I want more mobile games like Horizon Chase. I love paying 2-10 for stuff like that. We should start a thread on the very best mobile games.

    Was Chaos Rings any good? After FF13 I wouldn't pay $5 for something like PS4Pro-level FF15 (you'd have to pay me my hourly rate to play), let alone some mobile stuff I've not even heard about until now.
    Last edited by dataDave; 17-02-2018 at 04:20 AM.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Asura View Post
    It'll be interesting to see how the industry adapts if this stuff crosses over into mobile game territory as well...
    Yea, who knows how things will change. I imagine it'll take national or regional changes for this stuff to truly take impact. Historically publishers and platform holders have a tendency to use loopholes (Blizzard in China etc.) or even ignore laws until a precedent is set (i.e. *cough* Valve and allowing users to re-sell their games etc.). I imagine we'll see a variety of things, such as fixed price Microtransactions and other business models become more popular, certainly for the smaller developers and publishers.

    I would imagine if there are future laws enforced about lootboxes or microtransactions, then it will affect any platform irrespective of whether it's a PC, console, browser or mobile game. The bit which I think cannot be argued against is the exposure of this stuff to Children. And in this sense the ESRB or industry choosing to ignore this or even offer solutions will catch-up with them.

    What struck me about the post and other recent articles is the way the industry is doubling down on the defensive side. Sure that's not a surprise but it's often quite alarming to see how much of a bubble these developers are in. Before the forum wipe I linked to a very cringy article speaking to developers about their reaction to SW:BF2. Their view of the incident was in an entirely different light. Again that's perhaps to be expected given the impact on their livelihoods, but even so it's interesting.

  8. #28
    At some point the law will catch up and we will see some changes, but it a case of when 1,5,10,15 years from now.

    You have to ask some serious questions about someone willing to spend $60,000 on a CS:GO skin:
    http://www.gameinformer.com/b/news/archive/2018/01/31/someone-actually-spent-over-60000-on-a-counterstrike-weapon-skin.aspx

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by S3M View Post
    At some point the law will catch up and we will see some changes, but it a case of when 1,5,10,15 years from now.

    You have to ask some serious questions about someone willing to spend $60,000 on a CS:GO skin:
    http://www.gameinformer.com/b/news/archive/2018/01/31/someone-actually-spent-over-60000-on-a-counterstrike-weapon-skin.aspx
    When asked about the criticisms of such massive transactions, he seemed unfazed.

    “I didn’t originally get into this game solely for profit,” he says. “I just got very lucky a couple of times, and money is more valuable to different people. I’m very lucky in my financial state to where I can afford to buy these skins and it does not affect me.”
    He originally bought the skin for $30k and later sold it for $60k.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by S3M View Post
    You have to ask some serious questions about someone willing to spend $60,000 on a CS:GO skin:
    http://www.gameinformer.com/b/news/archive/2018/01/31/someone-actually-spent-over-60000-on-a-counterstrike-weapon-skin.aspx
    You think so? I tend to think that something is worth what a person is willing to pay.

    Like I wouldn't lose a wink of sleep if I sold a game on eBay for $60k. I'd wonder how someone could spend that much, sure, but I'd be fine taking the money.

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