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  • Niether here nor there

    0 0%
  • Nieds work

    0 0%
  • Nierly perfect

    3 50.00%
  • Gaming niervana

    3 50.00%
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Results 11 to 20 of 23
  1. #11
    Route B really adds a lot into the story / background!!

    This is the point that it got its hooks into me...

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by ItsThere View Post
    Route B really adds a lot into the story / background!!

    This is the point that it got its hooks into me...
    I've done all the main routes and their well worth doing, i cant believe how much of the game is hidden behind the false ending, if you've finished it once you've not finished it as the new areas that open up on the second and third play through's are pretty cool.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Lebowski View Post
    if you've finished it once you've not finished it
    This can be said for all of Platinum's titles. Finishing them the once and then shelving them is the same as credit-spamming a quality shmup and then being done with it.

    Hopefully PG can lift some of this Nier framework to entice players towards mastery of their forthcoming games. Far too many people don't taste the incentives related to mastery of game play (or the action genre would be MUCH bigger than it currently is) and score attacking alone isn't big enough a carrot - it's like they need a story to validate any further play out of people.

  4. #14
    Yeah, I find it queer how some players require a story in their games. In fact, reading recent reviews and impressions, the narrative is often given more attention than the gameplay. If a game is fun then it's fun. Doesn't need a story or purpose. The best things in life have no purpose. Dancing for example. You dance because you love to dance. You don't need a reason to dance. There's no aim to dancing. You're not looking to get anywhere or achieve anything. The joy is in dancing. The joy is in playing.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Zen Monkey View Post
    Yeah, I find it queer how some players require a story in their games. In fact, reading recent reviews and impressions, the narrative is often given more attention than the gameplay. If a game is fun then it's fun. Doesn't need a story or purpose. The best things in life have no purpose. Dancing for example. You dance because you love to dance. You don't need a reason to dance. There's no aim to dancing. You're not looking to get anywhere or achieve anything. The joy is in dancing. The joy is in playing.
    Yeah its fun zipping about and smashing giant boss robots with a sword and that hooks you in at first but then the story drags you into the world and enhances that enjoyment, it gives you more reason to progress, by adding depth and layers to the experience. its the same with dancing yeah you can dance to any beat (even a monkey banging a pan), but most people require a bit more depth to make them want to get up and dance and stay dancing

  6. #16
    Any news on if this is getting a physical release on xbox?

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Zen Monkey View Post
    Yeah, I find it queer how some players require a story in their games.
    It doesn't have to be a requirement. As Leb says it can enhance the experience. You yourself even commented on the interesting story in Divinity 2.

  8. #18
    It generally is a requirement. That's our point. Most players only stick with games until they've unravelled the story which was probably written by someone on 6 an hour who loves the prospect of turning up to work each day not knowing if it's their last or not.

    What we really need is game play in our games. All the best games don't require stories to carry them, if they do then the actual game itself can't be that good to begin with.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Lebowski View Post
    Yeah its fun zipping about and smashing giant boss robots with a sword and that hooks you in at first but then the story drags you into the world and enhances that enjoyment, it gives you more reason to progress, by adding depth and layers to the experience. its the same with dancing yeah you can dance to any beat (even a monkey banging a pan), but most people require a bit more depth to make them want to get up and dance and stay dancing
    I think you've misunderstood me. I don't mind a good story. A good story done properly can definitely enhance a game, but I don't consider it an important element. Ultimately, if the gameplay is good then I'm happy. I don't mind if the story is silly or even whether it exists at all. But these days it seems that every game has to have a story, there has to be a purpose, a reason, why you're doing what you're doing, even puzzle games like Puyo Puyo Tetris have a story. It's silly. If something is fun then, for me personally, that's reason enough to do it. No further imaginary purpose is required.

    Quote Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
    It doesn't have to be a requirement. As Leb says it can enhance the experience. You yourself even commented on the interesting story in Divinity 2.
    Divinity 2 has a great story, it's interesting and maturely written and definitely enhances my enjoyment of the game but it's the gameplay that keeps me playing. I'll almost certainly play through Divinity 2 again with a different party of characters despite knowing the story because it's the gameplay that is so much fun.
    Last edited by Zen Monkey; 08-10-2018 at 11:53 AM.

  10. #20
    I've finished this game now (the 5 main endings plus a few others) and It was a good ride.

    Everything I like about it in my 1st post I still like. I do think it over-egged and over-stayed itself, however, and I'm not sure quite where all the praise about it being such a ground-breaking work is coming from.

    The story is interesting and quite revelatory (several main routes/endings plus the others beyond the 'canonical'). The choice of 26 endings is basically arbitrary, though, one for each letter of the alphabet, In fact, if you try to treat it seriously as a narrative it's a bit barmy, e.g. 9S's entire story arc in Route 3 (

    utterly murderous even though he knows the machines are not at fault

    ).

    Ultimately, it's a fairly pretty looking beat-em-up that is flattered by having its action designed by Platinum (very far from their best, I would say), wrapped up in a melodrama about the ethics of AI development and the sentience, ethics and emotions of androids. I guess the cheesiness of this melodrama is disguised by the way it is fed out over several playthroughs. In terms of gameplay mechanics and balance: I didn't go chasing side-quests nor did I grind (for example, my Pods were all lvl 1 at completion after 45 hours of playtime), yet by the time I finished I barely needed to do anything to beat any encounter and had to force myself to be creative. I did what any good citizen should and carefully crafted and balanced my 'chips', and by the end I was practically untouchable. I'm basically crap at Platinum-type games but this feels a little unbalanced (at least at Normal difficulty).

    The visual style for combat, however, was fabulous. Environments remained a bit poor, low-texture and washed-out throughout. Seems they were trying to do a Fumita Ueda type aesthetic.

    The music started to grate by the end, especially the artist's predilection for singing in a made-up language. The sexploitation angle also started to annoy me. I know the director likes to see women in their knickers because he's said as much - and who doesn't - but the whole design of the female androids (especially A2), who are meant to be combatants, is basically a wank fantasy.

    I think the best thing about the game is the stylish menu system, which is miles in advance of almost any RPG type levelling/crafting game that I've played. It is so stylish and seamless, and it put me in mind of the awful clunky lag-fest of the Witcher 3 menus, for example, which sapped my will to continue with the game. The way this game handles RPG/customization systems reminded me a lot of Transistor, not only in style of execution but also in the creative flexibility it offered.

    But despite my few gripes I'm really glad I played it. It attempts something different and is carried by a decent combat system, and that is worth the price of entry. The 'enemy' robots are adorable and I demand they be made into plushes.
    Last edited by Golgo; 12-11-2018 at 11:35 AM.

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